Henry Fuseli

Portrait of Lavinia de Irujo

Portrait of Lavinia de Irujo by Henry Fuseli

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Lavinia de Irujo was the natural daughter of the Secretary of Legation to the Spanish Ambassador, Marquis del Campo, in London. According to John Wardroper, a Times newspaper article claimed the Marquis de Irujo had borrowed the livery of a footman as a disguise to trick Lavinia’s mother Sarah Knight into bed. Discovering how she had been misused, Sarah stormed the embassy door and his cruelty was revealed. Queen Charlotte found the article particularly entertaining, and publicly teased the ambassador about the incident whenever the opportunity arose.

Title
Portrait of Lavinia de Irujo
Artist/creator
Production date
1813
Medium
pencil and grey wash
Dimensions
260 x 170 mm
Inscription
Q.E. 13
Credit line
Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, purchased 1965
Accession no
1965/62
Copyright
No known copyright restrictions
Department
International Art
Display status
Not on display

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